A few of my favorite (tree) runs

Written by Anna Husted on  at

I've been skiing Big Sky Resort since I was three years old. However, the 2013-2014 winter is my first thorough exploration of all Lone Mountain has to offer, and what a winter it has been. We've had snow 15 out of the last 15 days, and each day I go out I take a Tram lap or two, but always find myself seeking new trails in the trees. I hope this list of my favorite runs at Big Sky encourages a bit of adventure-seeking through the boughs of old Evergreens as well as discovery of new terrain from the top of Lone Peak to the bottom.

Buffalo Jump and Buffalo Trees. Although Swift Current Lift glides directly past Buffalo Jump, it is a run often untracked, especially skier's left in the trees. The spacing of these trees allows for a perfect three-or-four-turn line before taking the fall line into a gully that eventually falls into Crazy Horse. I love tree runs, and this is one of the best. Named after the American Indian ritual of herding buffalo to their deaths by running them off of cliffs, Buffalo Jump (or Pishkun) is not filled with cliff bands although there are a few jumps to be found.
Challenger Trees. Powder stashes galore. I skied Challenger Trees just a few days ago and found line after untracked line. BRT (Big Rock Tongue) Road, which takes skiers over to Moonlight Lodge or Iron Horse Lift, breaks up this series of tree stashes skier's left of Challenger Lift: Like separating the wheat from the chaff.
Mr. K. Mr. K is everyone's favorite. OK, maybe not everyone, but it's a fantastic run with perfect pitches and fun to be had for skiers at all levels.
Elk Park Ridge. Elk, also known as "Wapiti," which means light-colored deer in Shawnee, could be found grazing in open meadows much like this one. I love Elk Park Ridge because I can ski it multiple times in many ways: a warm-up cruiser or go a little off-piste and find some freshies to skier's left.
Crazy Raven. Just a few runs skier's right from Elk Park Ridge lies Crazy Raven, a fantastic tree run with something new to explore every time. Named by John Kircher, Crazy Raven gets its name from the flock of lunch-stealing ravens residing in the area when the run was being cut. Even though the ravens stick closer to the top of Andesite these days, I don't recommend sitting down for a picnic lunch on this run anytime soon. Just point ‘em downhill and find fresh powder on this beautiful Andesite tree run.
Dirtbag Wall. To skier's left of Marx the Dirtbag Wall holds wonderful snow from top to bottom. The Dirtbag Wall fills in nicely this time of year and with a variety of chutes to choose from (specifically called Ace, King, Queen, Jack, and Wild Card) skiing Dirtbag Wall over-and-over again is quite satisfying.
Single Jack. Montana was founded on the backs of miners, and Single Jack is no exception to this history. A single jack is a hammer, essentially, with a four-pound head and 10-inch handle used for striking steel for drilling. This is not at all what it feels like jumping into Single Jack from Lookout Ridge off of Lone Tree Lift. Single Jack is a pleasant and wonderful tree run.
Pixie Trees. Pixie Trees is untouched. Between Far South and Eldorado on the Southern Comfort Lift side of Andesite lies wide open tree skiing among beautiful Lodgepole Pines. Since Far South and Eldorado are both Green Circles few beginners ski into the trees and few moderate to expert skiers find it beneficial to explore the fantastic terrain off SoCo.
-Anna

*Historical facts courtesy of Dr. Jeff Strickler's The Skier's Guide to the Biggest Skiing in America.

Anna on Dirtbag

RDT Skier in Trees
Photo © Ryan Day Thompson, 2014 | www.ryandaythompson.com

Tree Runs
Photo © Ryan Day Thompson, 2014 | www.ryandaythompson.com