Tips for a great day of riding

Written by Erik Morrison and Anna Husted on  at

The crew here at Big Sky Resort finds gliding down a mountain to be exhilarating, fun, scary, and a great workout. To keep safe and make the most fun of this exhilarating activity, here are some tips I find helpful in staying out on the slopes all season long.

Ski with a Buddy
When I'm surrounded by nature in the middle of the trees on one of my favorite runs, I find silence and solitude comforting. However, 9 times out of 10 I prefer to ski with a friend. Not only is it more fun, but it's also safer when I get into those little bumps in the trees. This holds true for beginners or experienced skiers. It's also good to have a buddy along to help capture all the fun with photos. Selfies!

When in doubt, point it out
When I get into a narrow shoot or some tight tree runs, instead of potentially blowing out an edge on a log (and ruining the run by side-sliding down it) I just point ‘em downhill. This saves the snow for even more skiers, and saves time, which results in getting more runs in one day.

Know when to turn ‘em
Beginning skiers learn quickly that if their skis are pointed straight downhill, the skis are going to carry them downhill, often in a big hurry. That's why turning is one of the most important skills a skier should harness. I learned how to ski through lessons, but also by watching my dad ski. The pros to this: I learned to turn by skiing behind my dad right in his tracks. The cons: I learned to ride in the backseat too much because that's how my dad skied. And that leads me to the next tip:

Keep command of your skis
I used to think I used my poles more than most skiers because they were my greatest asset for keeping out on top of my boards. I tell my skis when to turn, not the other way around. This is a tough tip to learn, but will help immensely in the long run (and makes skiing more fun).

Bring a snack
Not only do I not want my friends to get cranky for lack of sustenance, but I do not ski as well when I'm hungry. Food is energy and skiing exerts a lot of energy. Also, keep hydrating, especially at 11,166 feet. Just remember to throw away any garbage so it doesn't end up in the Gallatin River come spring.

Know when to call it a day
The fun and excitement of a day on the slopes can mask the fatigue my muscles may be experiencing after several runs. Most ski injuries happen late in the day and because of that, I try to avoid particularly challenging ski runs in the late afternoon or evening. It's true, my muscles and energy level may not always match my enthusiasm so I end the day with an easy run and rest up for the next.
-Anna and Erik

tram

Stumpf