Big Couloir Monoski Descent

Written by Anna Husted and Chris Kamman on at

Jamey Stogsdill has shredded Big Sky Resort and numerous Montana mountains since she was young. When she had an accident a few years ago she knew she wanted to keep shredding those mountains. About a week ago Jamey broke the boundary and became the first female monoskier (and third ever monoskier) to shred the Big Couloir. As someone who has yet to ski the Big, I find each person who goes over that edge to be inspiring, but Jamey's story breaks that inspiration into something more. I tear up every time I watch this video. Not at the part where Jamey talks about her accident, but at the part when she gets to the bottom of the Big. The joy she expresses in that moment is true insight into life.

Cinematography and Edited by Chris Kamman


Headwaters Spring Runoff: A competitor's conditions report

Written by Erik Morrison on at

Favorites ... Everyone has one. Mine just so happens to be a steep and twisted cirque on the north side of Big Sky Resort known as The Headwaters. After many years of hiking and riding the beautiful and sunny A-Z Chutes one day I found myself being strangely drawn to their darker and mysterious big sister The Headwaters. What I found was a whole new inbounds ski experience unlike anything I had ever seen. One that offered the relative ease of access provided by lifts, signage, a passionate and capable ski patrol and maintained hiking trails but... ended in obscurity. Standing atop the hike laid out before me was nothing short of a labyrinth. Interconnecting chutes, spines, rocky buttresses, hanging snowfields and massive amounts of exposure as far as my eyes could see were all open wall to wall. My partner and I sat a long time studying the cirque, watching other skiers and riders make their way, and getting comfortable with our new surroundings. The vibe of this place was intoxicating yet it's philosophy quite sobering: If you can see it you can ski it. In the world of resort skiing this was where the sidewalk ends. In The Headwaters the only limitations were my own.

It's been several years since that day and my passion and respect of The Headwaters has only grown. Each season I patiently watch and wait as the snow and winds shape and reshape the terrain. This season long study comes to a head each spring with the Headwaters Spring Runoff and the Subaru Freeride Series World Qualifier. These freeride competitions are held each year in the Headwaters venue and allow local and regional skiers and riders the chance to compete for fun, prizes, points and even a chance to compete on the Freeride World Tour. These conditions blogs below are my weekly observations of the venue and will hopefully serve as a resource for other competitors to stay safe, get creative and prepare for these events. Tune in here as well as Big Sky Resort's Facebook Page, Twitter, and Event Calendar for the latest news and info on conditions and competitions.

March 15: Adult Headwaters Spring Runoff (Click HERE to register)
March 22: Junior Headwaters Spring Runoff (This event is FULL. Click here to be put on the Wait List)
April 2-6: Subaru Freeride Series FWQ

Last Update March 12, 2014:

It's a powder day! Big Sky Resort just received 22-29"/24 hours. Mid-mountain base depth is 76" and the upper mountain base is 109". Winds are out of the NW at 5 mph. Skies are mostly sunny with temps around 25 degrees. Snow is a little heavier than normal and control work left a lot of debris in the run outs, but overall the skiing/riding is good. Forecast is calling for sunny skies and highs in the low 30's the next few days.

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The 9th Annual Headwaters Spring Runoff Adult Venue

Shots of The Headwaters from March 12, 2014: 

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Powder conditions continue at Big Sky Resort

Written by Anna Husted on at

The skiing and snowboarding at Big Sky Resort has been fantastic this year (I can attest to the skiing, the snowboarding is hearsay). With nearly a 100" base on the upper mountain, conditions are solid and powder can be found off of every lift. Mother Nature and Father Sky continually look kindly on Big Sky Resort as we have received snow 24 of the last 27 days, yet the sun has also shined through providing plenty of goggle tans.

Last Saturday, I skied off of Moonlight area lifts all day. As someone who grew up going to Big Sky Resort from the early 90s until today, I have been fortunate to explore the Moonlight side of Lone Peak this year. The first few runs of the day I stuck close to Moonlight Lodge (ensuring to get some of those Parmesan Garlic Fries on my ride break), mostly skiing in the trees through Upper Bearcat Gully, Hollywood or Snake Bite to Lower Bearcat Gully, Iron Maiden, and Dogwood. One word describes these runs, especially on a powder day: Contagious. Skiing in the gully near Iron Horse Lift is a unique experience few mountains provide. Sweet snowy turns through the trees give me an infectious delight. Although these runs are not as long as so many others up here off Lone Peak, they're worth exploring.

After my fries at Moonlight Lodge I ventured over to Lone Tree Lift to huck some cliffs. Kidding! But I did take a few hops off of small rocks on Lone Tree and enjoyed the subtle black diamond Grizzly Meadows.

The days I spend skiing pass by in a blur. How very lucky we all are to be able to welcome and enjoy all the fresh snow we received at Big Sky Resort, about 90" this past February. March is just getting started and I'm looking forward to yet another month of making the best of a great snowy situation.
-Anna

Ryan Turner Photography
Photo by Ryan Turner Photography 

Moonlight Lodge
Inside Moonlight Lodge


Q&A with Big Sky Resort's Terrain Park Manager Nate Bell

Written by Anna Husted on at

Love the Big Sky Terrain Parks? I do too, even if I can't hit many features. Here are a few facts and tidbits from our own terrain park expert, Nate Bell, Big Sky Resort's Terrain Park Manager:

How long have you worked at Big Sky Resort?
Three Years

How many parks do we have now?
Eight terrain parks total. Three large, three medium, and two small parks.

What new features are you most excited to a) build and b) hit?
We just finished a new feature called a lollipop that has become a huge hit in Zero Gravity Terrain Park. I'm most excited to hit The Ambush Jump Line on the far left of Ambush below Ramcharger Lift. They are decent sized and really fun.

Lollipop
The Lollipop now in Zero Gravity Terrain Park. 

What can last year's terrain park fans expect differently out of this year's parks?
A new look to all of our features and a massive feature count of more than 100.

Can we expect to see any pro or semi-pro athletes in the parks this year?
They are always around you just have to keep an eye out for them. Two days ago our park crew spotted Nicolas Müller a Swiss pro snowboarder lapping Zero Gravity.

If any athlete could come, who should come and why?
The Traveling Circus crew, because they travel the entire country but rarely to Montana.

What's your favorite feature and your favorite park?
The 42' up-down rail in Zero Gravity Terrain Park.

Check out the Smokin' Aces: Ace of Hearts Slopestyle competition on Saturday, March 8, starting around noon at the Zero Gravity Terrain Park. 


Tips for a great day of riding

Written by Erik Morrison and Anna Husted on at

The crew here at Big Sky Resort finds gliding down a mountain to be exhilarating, fun, scary, and a great workout. To keep safe and make the most fun of this exhilarating activity, here are some tips I find helpful in staying out on the slopes all season long.

Ski with a Buddy
When I'm surrounded by nature in the middle of the trees on one of my favorite runs, I find silence and solitude comforting. However, 9 times out of 10 I prefer to ski with a friend. Not only is it more fun, but it's also safer when I get into those little bumps in the trees. This holds true for beginners or experienced skiers. It's also good to have a buddy along to help capture all the fun with photos. Selfies!

When in doubt, point it out
When I get into a narrow shoot or some tight tree runs, instead of potentially blowing out an edge on a log (and ruining the run by side-sliding down it) I just point ‘em downhill. This saves the snow for even more skiers, and saves time, which results in getting more runs in one day.

Know when to turn ‘em
Beginning skiers learn quickly that if their skis are pointed straight downhill, the skis are going to carry them downhill, often in a big hurry. That's why turning is one of the most important skills a skier should harness. I learned how to ski through lessons, but also by watching my dad ski. The pros to this: I learned to turn by skiing behind my dad right in his tracks. The cons: I learned to ride in the backseat too much because that's how my dad skied. And that leads me to the next tip:

Keep command of your skis
I used to think I used my poles more than most skiers because they were my greatest asset for keeping out on top of my boards. I tell my skis when to turn, not the other way around. This is a tough tip to learn, but will help immensely in the long run (and makes skiing more fun).

Bring a snack
Not only do I not want my friends to get cranky for lack of sustenance, but I do not ski as well when I'm hungry. Food is energy and skiing exerts a lot of energy. Also, keep hydrating, especially at 11,166 feet. Just remember to throw away any garbage so it doesn't end up in the Gallatin River come spring.

Know when to call it a day
The fun and excitement of a day on the slopes can mask the fatigue my muscles may be experiencing after several runs. Most ski injuries happen late in the day and because of that, I try to avoid particularly challenging ski runs in the late afternoon or evening. It's true, my muscles and energy level may not always match my enthusiasm so I end the day with an easy run and rest up for the next.
-Anna and Erik

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