Video: Downhill Mountain Biking in Big Sky

Written by Anna Husted on at

Big Sky Resort is home to some of the most extreme downhill mountain biking in the area, yet I have never been downhill mountain biking. That doesn't mean I don't recognize impressive riding when I see it. Check out some epic mountain biking in the following video to get pumped for opening day of downhill riding June 21. Newly added at Big Sky Resort this year are intermediate trails off Explorer Lift. Maybe I'll find inspiration to get out there after all...


Scrambled: Golf and Hope

Written by Anna Husted on at

My first day of the year on the Golf Course at Big Sky Resort was for a friend's birthday scramble. Scrambles are the way to play when it's one's first day out or when playing like a first day out.

The day started with a fantastic Bloody Mary Bar at The Bunker Bar and Grill and smoothly transitioned into my favorite kind of golf tournament: One where individual scores do not count, team camaraderie prevails, and the biggest concern is: "when will the beverage cart come back around?" Even though I drove the ball terribly and had a sub-par putting game; my irons and I agreed tremendously hitting two balls from 100 yards out within a foot or two of the hole.

Golf is a game of refined skill where even the slightest movement of the club face changes the next lie. My inability to hit a ball out of the bunker on the first swing puts me in camp practice-does-not-make-perfect. Golf is the one sport where practice doesn't even make ok (although it might make you luckier). As Bob Hope said, "If you watch a game, it's fun. If you play it, it's recreation. If you work at it, it's golf." So I'll keep working at the game of golf by attending Women's Golf Clinics, going to the driving range, and partaking in as many birthday scrambles as possible. After all is said and done, whether scrambling or not, the achievement of golf lies in getting back out on the course, bad round after bad round. Much like skiing, golf is a lifetime sport that gives back in more subtle ways over time. I just can't let the game beat me before I find out what all those are.
-Anna

**Better Ball 2 Player Spring Draw Golf Tournament is June 7 at Big Sky Resort Golf Course. Sign up!

Sheila

fairway


Silent Spring Revisited

Written by Anna Husted on at

Just south of Big Sky near Taylor's Fork camp ground is one of my favorite spots on the Gallatin River. Last Thursday I spent the evening on the riverbank where white cliffs line the banks of the east side of the Gallatin and soft green grass balks in the sun.

Even though I have a variety of favorite Gallatin River spots, this is one not far from the road yet peacefully projected by wild grasses and ants. Highway 191 can be seen from my spot, but when sitting on the banks I'm hidden from the road and therefore distraction of the steady stream of passersby.

As the days grow longer and the sun shines brighter I long to spend more time on the Gallatin, whether fishing, reading, meditating, or rafting; the summer waters call. This particular Thursday it was just me, a friend, and the stillness of the water rushing past. Above the rushing waters Cliff Swallows, who find their homes in the shaly crags of the white cliffs nearby, feasted 100 feet overhead on hatches the fish would never find beneath the chocolaty Gallatin surface. My thoughts turned to those birds and the importance of their survival. Spurred by discussion on bear hunting with my friend, nature permeates Big Sky life beyond my daily interaction and understanding of it. I can debate on end whether or not bears should be hunted or whether or not cliff-nesting swallows (who also find resting places in our homes, at times attacking the home-owner) should be extinguished for my own peace-seeking desires, but I do not disagree that this canyon and surrounding mountains belonged to the bears and swallows first. I also do not disagree that I have a duty to protect their home. Thus on that beautiful sunny Thursday my thoughts turned to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, an American literary work I had not read in years, but that stuck with me. Carson asks the reader to consider a spring where no birds chirped, no ants pestered picnickers, and certainly no bears roamed the Gallatin Canyon, a silent spring.
Spring digs its rays of sunshine into the soil of the green grass and calls out each morning these days in Big Sky. It is alive and well at all my favorite spots along the Gallatin, and requires my attention more and more with each passing season. As Carson said, "the physical form and the habits of the earth's vegetation and its animal life have been molded by the environment ... Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species-man-acquired significant power to alter the nature of his world."

Unbeknownst to me upon writing this blog, May 27 would have been Rachel Carson's 107th birthday. Life in Big Sky is full of these connections and coincidences that, perhaps, are not coincidences at all, but reminders of the wonderful natural life that surrounds me in Big Sky. Reminders to take time to sit by the Gallatin River (or on it or fishing it) and contemplate all that this Big Sky life has to offer. It's going to be an amazing spring and one that is not silent at all.
-Anna

gallatin

grass

cliffs

Photos: Anna Husted


The quietest times to visit Yellowstone National Park

Written by Anna Husted on at

Yellowstone National Park hosts more than 3 million visitors a year. As much of a people person as I am, visiting a national park should not be like going to Disneyland. Even though Disneyland hosts an average of 15 million visitors a year, 3 million people in Southwest Montana's prized treasure feels like 15 million. Therefore, I've researched the quietest days to visit Yellowstone National Park and if I'm lucky I won't see you there!

1) Before June 15 or after Labor Day. The great thing about these dates is Big Sky Resort is open June 8 and well after Labor Day, which gives me the chance to do fun activities here one day and go to Yellowstone the next.
2) Not July or August. However, when this is my only option for days to go to Yellowstone then it's best to go on a hike through some of the 2 million acres of backcountry wilderness because 95% of visitors are "windshield visitors" and never venture into the wilderness. Suggested hikes: Purple Mountain Trail is near the Madison Campground and is a moderate 6-mile hike with a fantastic view at the top. Mystic Falls Loop is a scenic overlook 2.5-mile loop hike near Biscuit Basin.
3) Sundays. Yellowstone National Parks Trip Advisor page recommends visiting on a Sunday as that is the biggest travel transition day. The traffic in and out of the park might still be a bit less than desirable, but the park itself remains quieter on Sundays.

The beauty of living so close to one of the greatest national parks is I can pick up and drive whenever I want. But I definitely keep these tidbits in mind to have a full experience of the natural wonders in Yellowstone National Park.
-Anna

yellowstone


Video: Sentimental Summer Preview

Written by Anna Husted and Chris Kamman on at

"We're nowhere that I'm familiar with, in country that I've never seen before, yet I don't feel a stranger in it."-Robert M. Pirsig on Montana in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Montana summers are sentimental for me, especially Big Sky summers. From the crisp smell of mornings in the mountains to the smell of a charcoal grill firing up in the evenings, Montana summers encapsulate the human spirit in two words: Beauty and Adventure. I cannot wait to see my first bear, visit Fairy and Upper Waterfalls at Yellowstone National Park, camp near the Gallatin River, and ride the Tram to the top of Lone Peak. This summer will be full of excitement and sentiment as I make new memories with old and new friends, and discover for myself something new about living in the mountains during the summer season. The following video not only shows all the activities I'm excited to experience this summer, but also spurs that summer sentiment so much of Montana reveals. Join me out here.


Video shot and edited by Chris Kamman


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