Bungee Trampoline... It's For Adults Too

Written by Sheila Chapman on at

Bungee Trampoline At Big Sky Resort the Basecamp To Yellowstone Park
So there I am standing in line behind a 6-year-old girl waiting my turn to get on the bungee trampolines in the Mountain Village Plaza at Big Sky Resort. She and I watch an 8-year-old boy attempting a flip and a 3-year-old girl bouncing as she giggles looking at her parents, both of them have ear-to-ear grins on their faces. Well, here I go a 40-something year old woman about to find her inner child.

Barefoot I climb onto the trampoline. The Basecamp bungee trampoline guide connects two bungee cords to my harness, I look over at the 6-year-oild girl and she already has it figured out- jumping and laughing on the twin trampoline next to mine. The guide explains some how-to's for jumping, she steps off, and tells me to have fun.

I start off a little on the shy side- I haven't done this in a while and I make some baby jumps at first. I put some more leg into it and it's like an instantaneous transformation...

BAM... my fearless inner 6-year-old comes out and I'm using those bungees to launch me in the air, bouncing higher and higher. I can't stop laughing and smiling and feeling free. As I rocket again in the air I start singing out loud "sky rockets in flight... [insert sound effect]... afternoon delight" by the Starland Vocal Band (yes, I had to Google it). Now I hear my guide laughing and yelling to me to do a flip. Woo Hoo- I'm six again! Ahh yeah I can do flips- watch this! My first attempt at a flip brought me back to the reality of my adult form. Not as easy and nor as graceful as I pictured in my head.

I fly up again, my inner 6-year-old tells me I can do it. Using what little abs strength I have I throw a backward flip. Yeehaw! I did it!! Now I'm trying to jump even higher, the bungee cords stretching to heights of 30-feet. I do another flip and another. My inner 6-year-old is roaring, I'm laughing, and the crowd of parents are cheering me on. Then my 40-something year old body pipes up. This is on heck of a workout. I'm using all my core muscles. I become breathless and my legs are tiring. Of course my brain interjects on my body's behalf, "time to let the other kids have a turn." So I slow my jumping to a stop, dismount and slap a high five with a 3-year-old boy waiting in line.

As I walk across the plaza, my inner 6-year-old girl skipping in my heart, with an ear-to-ear grin on my face.

-Sheila


Training for a 50K?

Written by Lyndsey Owens on at

Training on the trail with Enthusiastic Training Partner

I love running. Running distances for fun, like on a Sunday- all day. I know this is not the norm because I only know a few people that get as excited as me when I ask if they want to go- and I mean I can count them on one hand.

It was a Saturday this past January. I had just returned from some morning skiing when my phone rings. It’s my friend Allison (she is counted on that one hand mentioned above). “Where are you? It is registration day and the 30k already sold out in 5 minutes.” she says. I reply “What? Oh better get on it” . So my race begins, at a computer, six months before the physical start line. There I was feverishly pecking away my information with credit card in hand. The result? Allison has the last spot in the Big Horn Wild and Scenic 50k and me close behind landing first on the wait list.

A few weeks later I am explaining my predicament to Mike Foote, accomplished mountain runner on The North Face Ultra Running Team and Race Director for the Rut 50k & 12K at Big Sky Resort. “You’re first on the wait list? Oh don’t worry, you will get in. You better start training.” Foote says. He was right. In April I got my confirmation, I was in!

Training….uhhh….Training for a 50k, I like running, but I am no expert on actually training for 31.6 miles. I sought out the internet for some advice.

“The 50K schedule alternates between hard weeks and easy weeks to allow recovery and help prevent overuse injuries that may occur from ramping up mileage too quickly. Rest is essential.”
http://www.trailrunevents.com/ul/schedule-50k.asp

“….there is no one-size-fits-all approach to a foray into ultra-running. Adapting to increased mileage, developing the ability to run while fatigued and experimenting with different nutrition and hydration needs are all very individual endeavors.”
http://running.competitor.com/2012/11/training/going-longer-how-to-train-for-your-first-50k_61887

I like that it is subjective to the person and I think I can work with this. Rest is something I have failed at in the past especially during the taper. I have definitely experimented with the ability to run while fatigued and with different nutrition and hydration, not that it was a success. With all that in mind I put together this checklist on what I essentially needed in my training:

1. Time
2. Enthusiastic and Willing Training Partners
3. Hydration
4. Nutrition

Time, where does it go? This was my biggest challenge. Trying to find the time to log all the miles. I found that I had to juggle priorities to hit the numbers. As always, I would have liked more time in the day to run more.

Training partners. As I mentioned before there are a limited number of people I can call and say “What are you doing on Saturday? Want to run all day?” or “Meet me at 6 am for a trail run?” and get a “Yes, I’d love to” response. A good partner is essential and will keep me motivated and it’s always more fun to share the experience, especially in Big Sky, Montana and the greater Yellowstone ecosystem where the views alone are awe-inspiring. Another thing in our world today is “there’s an app for that” and guess what? There is an app for training! I found my iPhone app Runmeter to be an effective training partner for only $1.99. It logs my distance, time, pace and elevation. This app assisted tremendously by connecting my “how I feel today” to some hard numbers. Runmeter talks to me while I run, updating me on my distance, time and pace…I liked that a lot too. I have had many conversations with fellow runners and everyone seems to have an app that they like and use- that’s great.

Hydration, managing this is essential. More miles equals more water, hydrating pre-run is ultra-important and I have learned to drain my hydration pack (a Nathan pack) before the downhill to avoid back pain later. Have you ever heard of ancient medicine like Aruveda? I have tried it- Aruveydic practitioner Callie Stolz (www.santoshabigsky.com) introduced me to this rehydration therapy: a warm cup of water with fresh lemon in the morning. It’s a delicious way to start the day and I do think it has worked for me.

Nutrition, eating the right foods at the right time is important. I am still figuring this one out. Through much trial and error I have found what works for me and what does not. I have also learned to play it safe on race week with my diet. My husband and I have moved toward a plant based diet. We have kept our diet clean with organics and local when possible (sometimes hard to do, but worth it). I have found an Aruveyda approach to eating has been beneficial for me. Good websites like www.joyfulbelly.com and seeking advice from a professional- Aruveydic practitioner (Callie Stolz) provided more understanding on nutrition and digestion.

After all I hope all my training will make the day more fun, because for me that is really what it is all about. This Saturday, June 15 is the day I have been working for over the past 6 months. I am a little nervous, but mostly excited to spend most of the daylight running, because I love it. Wish me luck or better yet join me wherever you are by running a few miles on Saturday.

Looking for your next trail race? Big Sky Resort is hosting The Rut 50k and 12k September 14, 2013. Run the Rut- sign up today. There is limited availability and spots are going quickly. Oh and I recommend you start training!

-Lyndsey

Mile 20

I am still smiling at mile 20. After a down pour and lightning.

allison

Enthusiastic running partner- Allison looking fast on an all day training run.

Snow

Enthusiastic running partners found snow! Sometimes you got to grin and bear it.

Apps are fun! More App StuffRunmeter

Look what my app can do! Runmeter logs all the important stats.


3 Reasons Why You Can't Beat a Summer Vacation to Big Sky Resort

Written by Kipp Proctor on at

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Nestled in the southwest corner of Montana between the city of Bozeman and the west entrance to Yellowstone National Park sits Big Sky: a small mountain town with a Montana sized heart. While known as one of the country’s top ski resort destinations, the charming yet lively town blossoms into a summer resort with so many activities at your fingertips, it would be nearly impossible to check them all off in just one visit.

Big Sky is easily accessed via the Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport and a short 50 minute drive through stunning Gallatin Canyon. The setting for the movie A River Runs Through It, Gallatin Canyon offers a beautiful and scenic setting to take in as you navigate your way down highway 191 along the banks of the Gallatin River.

While the scenic drive alone would sell most on a visit, here are three key reasons why Big Sky needs to be at the top of your list of must do summer vacations.

Basecamp to Yellowstone Park: If you want to make your summer vacation feel more like Family Summer Camp, look no further than Basecamp. Conveniently located in the Resort’s Mountain Village, it serves up an extensive activities menu that ranges on the adventure scale from easy going to full on adrenaline rush for the entire family. With activities geared specifically for little ones, teens, adults or all the above, there’s something for everyone.

The guided Lone Peak Expedition ($79/person) whisks you to the top 11,166 ft. Lone Peak via chairlift, Mountain Safari Truck and Lone Peak Tram. From the top take in the 360 degree views that overlook 3 states, 2 national parks, and mountain ranges as far as the eye can see. On your way to the summit, one of Big Sky’s friendly and knowledgeable Basecamp guides will point out different geological features along with specific peaks that begin to emerge on the horizon.

Lone Peak Expedition too mellow? Harness up for the Adventure Zipline Tour ($79/person) to pick up the pace and really get the blood flowing. Coupled with heart pounding speed, multiple spans and gorgeous mountain vistas, it’ll put a whole new spin on the wild wild west. Don’t worry though if the adventure part is a bit intimidating, the Nature Zipline Tour ($59/person) offers an option for those looking for a more scenic and less adrenaline driven option. With height and weight requirements of only 3ft. and 45lbs. respectively, there’s nearly no barrier for a family to part in this fun-filled activity.

For a full list of Big Sky’s Basecamp offerings, visit
www.bigskyresort.com/basecamp.

Close vicinity to Yellowstone: With geysers, mud pots, western wildlife, and an awe-inspiring backdrop a short and scenic 45 minute drive away, Big Sky’s closeness to Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is no doubt one of the top reasons to visit in the summer.

Known as the world’s first national park, Yellowstone offers more than enough elbow room for you and any in-laws. Spanning an area of 3,468.4 square miles, half of the world’s geothermal features (geysers, mud pots, hot springs, etc.) call YNP home making it one of the most visually stunning parks in the world. A few of the notable attractions that make for a memorable Yellowstone experience include Old Faithful, Yellowstone Falls, Grand Prismatic Spring, and the Fountain Paint Mud Pots but only comprise 4 of over 10,000 total geothermal features within the park’s gates.

If the colors and showmanship of the geothermal features aren’t enough, the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is one of the last remaining large and nearly intact ecosystems in the northern temperate zone. Hundreds of species of birds, mammals, fish, and reptiles make it their home here including grizzly bears, wolves, and free-ranging herds of bison and elk. Following the roads that lead you through the park, it’s easy to view of these animals in their natural habitat from the safety of your car or from a distance at one of the many viewing pullouts along the way.

Think of it as an American Safari from the safety and comfort of your car that’s taken at your own pace. For more park information visit: www.yellowstone.visitmt.gov.

Family Friendly: Remember the good old days when parents allowed their children to roam freely without a worry about their wellbeing? Guess what, at Big Sky they still do.

With a centrally located mountain village, the resort features a layout with every activity, meal, or lodging option only a few steps away. Personally, I’ve always enjoyed the inviting mountain plaza that sort of acts as the hub within the resort which offers picnic tables, a free putt-putt course and Lone Peak as the backdrop. From here you can easily access Basecamp, stores in the Mountain Mall, or simply bask in the sunshine while catching up with friends and family.

Adding to the safe, tight knit feeling of the village, the friendly resort staff polishes things off with their warm Montana Hospitality and desire to ensure your stay is the best it can be. So unleash the kids, kick back, and rest assured that as long as they’re not trying to pet the wildlife, they’re probably not getting into trouble.

Whether you’re checking off items on your bucket list, heading out for a quick hike around the base area, or lounging by one of the resort pools, Big Sky has the ingredients for an unforgettable summer vacation. So load up Aunt Edna and the old family Truckster because Lone Peak and the Big Sky state are beckoning.

-Kipp Proctor


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A scenic lift ride gets you half way to the top and just above the tree line
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Lower Tram Dock and the Mountain Safari truck
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The view from the atop 11,166 ft. Lone Peak
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One of the many natural hot springs
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Bull Elk bedding down in the tall grass
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YNP's most common foot hoof traffic
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One of the views from the Nature Zipline Tour
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The mountain plaza
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Smoke Jumper Giant Swing located in the Mountain Village

Hiking in a Wildflower Kaleidoscope

Written by Lyndsey Owens on at

The View from a Hiking Trail

As I hike into an open meadow the flitter of colors catch my eyes. Wildflowers, stunning and magical. Immediately my inner Von Trapp family singer emerges and I have an overwhelming desire to belt out an Americana classic that will echo across the slopes and bring the hills alive with the sound of music.

While I was in college at MSU Bozeman, I spent my summers in Big Sky bagging peaks and logging miles throughout the Lee Metcalf Wilderness that cradles the west end of Big Sky Resort's Lone Peak. I was studying hard on my other degree: becoming a "self-proclaimed naturalist". This prestigious acclaim does not come with a transcript or gown, but the accomplishment is rewarded by friends trusting my knowledge of local flora and fauna. I am regularly quizzed by them with a finger point and the question, "what is this?"

A visit to Big Sky country in July will be filled with colorful dancing meadows and alpine vistas. I will use my "degree" and recommend a few good wildflower hikes near Big Sky Resort.

Windy Pass: This trail rolls up with some short steep inclines through forest and meadows for 2.5 miles to the Windy Pass Cabin. Continue past the cabin another .5 miles to the Gallatin Crest Trail.
Getting There:
From Big Sky, Montana, proceed northbound for 6 miles on Highway 191 until you reach the Portal Creek Road 984 (RIGHT TURN). Follow this rough gravel road (note: may not be suitable for low clearance vehicles) up approximately 6 miles to the end at the Windy Pass and Golden Trout Lakes Trailheads. Windy Pass Trail 82 is left of the bulletin board. The cabin is 2.5 miles up (1300 foot elevation gain) the Windy Pass Trail 82.

Cinnamon Mountain: The climb to Cinnamon Mountain lookout lopes upward through forest and open meadows for 4 miles one way. The views of the Taylor Hilgard and Spanish Peaks of the Madison Range are stunning on a clear day. The lookout at the top is no longer manned, but the structure still remains.

Getting There:
From Big Sky, Montana, head southbound for about 11 miles U.S. Highway 191 south to Cinnamon Creek Road. The road is 100 yards south of The Cinnamon Lodge (great spot for after hike refreshments) on highway 191. Turn right on the dirt road and follow for 0.3 mile to the Cinnamon Station and the parking area.

-Lyndsey

You can spot these pretty little things in and around Big Sky Resort.
Below in order Lupine, Sticky Geranium, Spring Beauties & Glacier Lily.

Lupine Sticky Geranium Spring Beauties Glacier Lily