April (Snow) Showers Blog

Five Reasons to Ski Big Sky in April

One of the great existential questions of a skier's life: corn or powder? Luckily, at Big Sky Resort in April you don't have to choose. With the resort's northern latitude and the high elevation of Lone Mountain, you can ski corn on south-facing slopes and powder on the northern-facing ones. Even as folks are dusting off their flip-flops and mountain bikes, it's still very much ski season at Big Sky. Here are five reasons why you shouldn't put your skis away in April.

1. Spring Corn
Effortless and hilariously fun, corn snow can be hard to find but easy to love. And with spring's warm days and cold nights, Big Sky's southerly aspects are a regular corn factory.

2. Spring Pow
There are many north-facing slopes at Big Sky Resort that hold powder well past the last day of the season. The Headwater's Ridge and the North Summit Snowfield come alive during this time of year. The sun is out. The shades are on. The powder turns are plentiful.

3. Alpine Lounging
Alpine lounging season is officially here. Skiers and riders don funny outfits, and post up at one of the fabulous decks Big Sky Resort has to offer. I recommend Everett's 8800 for the best views of Lone Peak. Shedhorn Grill after some south-facing laps, or the Mountain Mall if you want to be in the middle of the party. My personal favorite is the Headwater's Grill for its mellow vibe and view of the Headwater's Ridge.

4. Everything is Filled In
With an alpine base depth of more than 120 inches and more snow this season than there's been in 20 years, Big Sky's conditions are as good as it gets. AND it's still dumping outside! Wetter spring storms plaster the mountainside with delicious creamy hero snow. So grab a cape, your shades and strap into your boots and bindings.

5. Most Other Ski Areas are Closed
You want to ride a tram to 11,166 feet in April and ski laps? Come to Big Sky. End of story.

-Emily Stifler Wolfe


Emily Stifler Wolfe is a freelance writer based in Bozeman and a former ski patroller in Big Sky. Find her work at emilystiflerwolfe.com.